Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Teaser Tuesday: Children of Refuge


Teaser Tuesday is hosted by MizB of Books And A Beat. To participate, simply do the following: Grab your current read Open to a random page Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn't give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Monday, January 15, 2018

All About Middle Grade Review: Children of Refuge


Children of Refuge (Children of Exile, 2) by Margaret Peterson Haddix, September 12, 2017. 272 pages. Published by Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers. Source: Publisher.
It’s been barely a day since Edwy left Fredtown to be with his parents and, already, he is being sent away. He’s smuggled off to boarding school in Refuge City, where he will be with his brother and sister, who don’t even like him very much. The boarding school is nothing like the school that he knew, there’s no one around looking up to him now, and he’s still not allowed to ask questions!

Alone and confused, Edwy seeks out other children brought back from Fredtown and soon discovers that Rosi and the others—still stuck in the Cursed Town—might be in danger. Can Edwy find his way back to his friends before it’s too late? 

First Sentence
The man lunged out of the darkness to grab me as I ran by.



After the surprise twist at the end of Children of Exile, I could not wait to read the next one. Lucky for me, I just so happened to have a copy that I was fortunate enough to receive for review consideration.

  • It has taken me longer than planned to get my thoughts in order to discuss Children of Refuge. It was a great book, but one that requires some 'unpacking' to really delve into why it was such a fascinating book. Bear with me as I try to explain, without spoiling it, why it left such an impact on me as a reader and why I think y'all should be interested in checking out the series as a whole (p.s. there's still one more book after this one [not released yet *cries*]).
  • First off, I really enjoyed that this book was told from Edwy's perspective as it gave the story a new angle to see things from. Even though Edwy and Rosi are quote different from one another, they have more in common then you think when it comes to their respective story lines. Not just in that they were the oldest in the Fred-Town that they were taken to as young children; but in that they both had different prejudices to work through to gain an understanding of the world that they were returned to and their what role they would choose to play in it. 
  • Now onto the aspects of the book that have caused me problems (hence the delay on this post) in putting this post together. There are many reasons that I thought it was interesting to include certain aspects of the the city of Refuge in the book; like how the citizens there went about insulated in a world of their own without really taking note of those around them...except if they were 'someone'.I know I am not putting this well, but it spoke so much to our times and how everyone is so absorbed in their phones that there is no real communication anymore. You know that feeling  of everyone's only in it for themselves, I thought Margaret Peterson Haddix did an excellent job showing how that mentality is so destructive. It was done in a boldly yet subtle way.
Final Verdict: Children of Refuge- Wonderful character development and progress of the overall plot makes this a great follow-up to Children of Exile. I will now impatiently await to see what will happen next (that end, of my gosh!!)!!


A copy of this book was received for review consideration. All thoughts are my own.

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

I Want to Read It (85): Children of Refuge



I Want to Read It, a hybrid between WLW (or WOW) and what's on my to-be-read pile. Well, instead of focusing just on books I would like to acquire, I will be using it to feature books that I just want to read. From the ones, I want to buy to the one's sitting on my TBR at home.



Children of Refuge (Children of Exile, 2) by Margaret Peterson Haddix, September 12, 2017. Published by Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers. 
It’s been barely a day since Edwy left Fredtown to be with his parents and, already, he is being sent away. He’s smuggled off to boarding school in Refuge City, where he will be with his brother and sister, who don’t even like him very much. The boarding school is nothing like the school that he knew, there’s no one around looking up to him now, and he’s still not allowed to ask questions!

Alone and confused, Edwy seeks out other children brought back from Fredtown and soon discovers that Rosi and the others—still stuck in the Cursed Town—might be in danger. Can Edwy find his way back to his friends before it’s too late?
Why


In case you missed it, I shared my thoughts on Children of Exile earlier this week and, well, now I need to know what will happen next. That ending, oh my gosh, what a fascinating plot twist! I really just need to know what will happen next in the story and for the characters.

Have you read Margaret Peterson Haddix's Children of Exile? 

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Teaser Tuesday: Children of Exile


Teaser Tuesday is hosted by MizB of Books And A Beat. To participate, simply do the following: Grab your current read Open to a random page Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn't give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Monday, January 8, 2018

All About Middle Grade Review: Children of Exile



Children of Exile (Children of Exile, 1) by Margaret Peterson Haddix, September 13, 2016. 304 pages. Published by Simon Schuster Books for Young Readers. Source: Publisher for review.
For the past twelve years, adults called “Freds” have raised Rosi, her younger brother Bobo, and the other children of their town, saying it is too dangerous for them to stay with their parents, but now they are all being sent back. Since Rosi is the oldest, all the younger kids are looking to her with questions she doesn’t have the answers to. She’d always trusted the Freds completely, but now she’s not so sure.

And their home is nothing like she’d expected, like nothing the Freds had prepared them for. Will Rosi and the other kids be able to adjust to their new reality?
First Sentence
We weren't orphans after all.

Long time no post, I know! I ran out of scheduled posts about halfway through December and with one of the dog's needing surgery (he's fine now) I just never had the time to sit down to get more posts up and ready. Till now!

  • Originally, I had thought that Children of Exile was my first Margaret Peterson Haddix book, I was mistaken. Which explains why there was something about her writing in this one that kept tugging at my memory; it was that I was mildly familiar with it. While I would not consider myself to be an expert on her writing, I did find myself enjoying the way the plot took a sharp turn for the odd near the end of the book. 
  • Even though I really enjoyed the second half of the book, the first half was really, well, not too great. In the moment, the beginning of the book really bothered me; it felt like the watering down of, well, everything that has pervaded society, yet, the more I think back over it, it seems more like a covert jab at that mentality. I honestly cannot explain it any better than that. 
  • I really liked the way the characters, mainly Rosi as the first book focuses mostly on her, slowly developed throughout the book. It was interesting to see how their viewpoints shifted the more they learned about what led to them growing up with Fred-Parents and not their biological parents; I really loved how well the author captured the emotions that sparked off as Rosi started learning the truth. 
  • Children of Exile was quite fascinating, while it took me some time to get into the story itself, it was really something to see all the various layers of the story as they came together. Like I said, very fascinating. I am definitely hoping that the context, like a broader scope of what set of the events leading up to the children being taken away, will be addressed in the next book. 

  • As far as I know, I have only read (counting this one) three books by Margaret Peterson Haddix; all of which have been vastly different from one another. I must say, her writing and storytelling, from the three I've read, is both vast and varied. Yet, she easily writes stories, from sci-fi/Dystopian to historical fiction, with such ease. 

Final Verdict: Children of Exile- I really loved how well she handled the story. It did a great job of illustrating that things are not always as clear-cut as most people assume; definitely fascinating to see Rosi deal with the two sides of the story (yes, I'm being vague *spoilers*)


A copy of this book was received for review consideration. All thoughts are my own.

linkwithen

Blog Widget by LinkWithin